Woman bludgeoned to death with motorized scooter, police say

first_imgwsfurlan/iStock(LONG BEACH, Calif.) — A man was arrested Monday for allegedly beating a 63-year-old woman to death with a motorized scooter in Southern California, police said.The woman, identified as Rosa Elena Hernandez, was attacked on a sidewalk in Long Beach in broad daylight. The assailant at one point used a motorized scooter to bludgeon her and then fled, according to the Long Beach Police Department.Hernandez, a local resident, was pronounced dead at the scene Monday afternoon, police said. The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office is still determining the official cause of death.The suspect, who was described as a man wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and red shoes, was located a few hours later and taken into custody without incident. He was booked for murder and is being held on $2 million bail, police said.Police declined to identify the man until records can confirm his information.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Director, Web and Campus Applications

first_imgRequired Qualifications This position is open until filled.Contact InformationUniversity [email protected] InformationSatisfactory completion of a background check (including a criminalrecords check) is required for employment. SJSU will issue acontingent offer of employment to the selected candidate, which maybe rescinded if the background check reveals disqualifyinginformation, and/or it is discovered that the candidate knowinglywithheld or falsified information. Failure to satisfactorilycomplete the background check may affect the continued employmentof a current CSU employee who was offered the position on acontingent basis.The standard background check includes: criminal check, employmentand education verification. Depending on the position, a motorvehicle and/or credit check may be required. All background checksare conducted through the university’s third party vendor, AccurateBackground. Some positions may also require fingerprinting. SJSUwill pay all costs associated with this procedure. Evidence ofrequired degree(s) or certification(s) will be required at time ofhire.SJSU IS NOT A SPONSORING AGENCY FOR STAFF OR MANAGEMENT POSITIONS.(e.g. H1-B VISAS)All San José State University employees are considered mandatedreporters under the California Child Abuse and Neglect ReportingAct and are required to comply with the requirements set forth inCSU Executive Order 1083 as a condition of employment.Equal Employment StatementSan José State University (SJSU) is an EqualOpportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed tonondiscrimination on the basis of age, ancestry, citizenshipstatus, color, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender, geneticinformation, marital status, medical condition, national origin,race, religion or lack thereof, sex, sexual orientation,transgender, or protected veteran status consistent with applicablefederal and state laws. This policy applies to all SJSU students,faculty and staff programs and activities. Title IX of theEducation Amendments of 1972, and certain other federal and statelaws, prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in all educationprograms and activities operated by the university (both on and offcampus). Job SummaryThe Director leads a department of IT application programmers, ITapplication analysts and IT Consultants for identifying,delivering, integrating, configuring, maintaining, training andsupporting the campus’ business productivity applications. TheDirector serves as a member of the SJSU IT Enterprise Solutionsgroup and works in collaboration with leaders in SJSU IT LeadershipTeam and other divisions to support the university’s strategicplan.This position will assist in conducting annual assessment ofservices, quarterly measurements with formal reporting, andevaluating and implementing needed changes to satisfy our students,faculty, and staff. The incumbent oversees the planning, design,development and implementation of the architecture of IT EnterpriseApplications and other university services in coordination withpeers in SJSU IT. This includes configuring, maintaining, andsupporting SJSU’s enterprise software applications.The Director identifies, assigns, and prioritizes work assignmentsfor staff; develops personal growth opportunities and recruits andtrains staff and student assistants. The incumbent collaborateswith staff on project assignments, and with directors on staffissues, concerns and staff development. Annual performanceevaluations and professional development of staff are part of theseduties. The incumbent represents SJSU IT in various collaborativecampus venues, leveraging them for feedback and guidance.This is a position in the CSU – Management Personnel Plan (MPP),and serves at the pleasure of the President. This position willrequire adherence to University compliance training such as:Conflict of Interest and Ethics, AB 1825 Sexual HarassmentPrevention, Information Security, and Injury and Illness PreventionProgram. The person hired for this position may be required tocomplete an outside employment disclosure statement in accordancewith Title V of the California Code of Regulations.Key Responsibilities Combination of demonstrated skills in end-user servicemanagement, technology management, process engineering, customercentric thinking, and executive communication.Strong collaboration, consultative, and teambuilding skills towork effectively with faculty, staff, and senior administrators todevelop and implement appropriate uses of technology to solvebusiness problems.Demonstrated leadership abilities in a broad range oftechnology within a complex enterprise computing environment or auniversity environment.Demonstrated skill in hiring, coaching and developing atechnical and customer service team.Effective interpersonal skills coupled with the ability todevelop an environment that promotes partnership and transparencywith other organizations.Proven commitment to promoting and maintaining aservice-oriented culture that also supports a learning organizationwhere knowledge, competence and performance are encouraged andpositively impact business results.Possess a balance of highly developed management skills as wellas specialized technical expertise.Ability to manage people with increasing responsibilitiesmanaging information technology professionals.Excellent oral and written technical and communication skillsrequired to communicate effectively with diverse academic andadministrative constituencies both on and off campus.A high degree of operations and service skills .Demonstrated skill in leveraging technology to achieve the mosteffective and efficient solutions to support teaching, studentlearning and business processes.Strong project management and organizational skills.Knowledge of systems design and implementation and applicationsupport/administration.Ability to understand complex challenges and lead teams oftechnologists to deploy appropriate technological solutions thatmeet campus vision and mission.High ethical standards and business acumen.Skills in managing organizational budgets and tracking ongoingexpenses with budgetAbility to remain professional at all times and to be part of ateam.Ability selecting and managing outside software vendors andconsulting/contracting firms to deliver service. CompensationClassification: Administrator IIIHiring Range: Commensurate with experienceSan José State University offers employees a comprehensive benefitspackage typically worth 30-35% of your base salary. For moreinformation on programs available, please see the Employee Benefits Summary .Application ProcedureClick Apply Now to complete the SJSU Online Employment Applicationand attach the following documents: Advertised: March 09, 2021 (9:00 AM) Pacific StandardTimeApplications close: Preferred Qualificationscenter_img Knowledge, Skills & Abilities Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology, Computer Science,business discipline or other related areaFive years or more of progressive experience in InformationTechnology management position Communicate the IT mission, vision, and priorities to thedepartment team.Provide ongoing coaching and feedback to employees throughregularly scheduled 1-1s and ongoing interaction. Provide annualwritten performance evaluations and specific coaching ondevelopmental areas.Develop and maintain annual workforce plan defining capacity ofroles and necessary skill development to provide defined serviceswithin SLA and improve customer satisfaction.Recruit, interview, select, and train required staff andstudent assistants to meet ongoing workforce plan and staffingfunding.Ensure the appropriate CSU and SJSU Human Resources, and SJSUIT policies and practices are implemented correctly.Ensure the ongoing operational delivery of all services withinagreed upon SLA definitions.Develop measurement system to control ongoing deliveryperformance of services and take appropriate corrective andpreventive action to ensure operational excellence.Develop and maintain annual/quarterly/monthly resource planidentifying and allocating resources against projects andoperational resource services/requests.Work with User and SJSU IT management team to ensure a clearprioritization of inbound work, tradeoffs of commitments, andallocation of resources.Manage the execution of the overall portfolio of projects andoperational services within the department.Ensure projects are delivered on scope, on time, and withinbudget.Manage the planning, design, development and implementation ofWeb and Business Applications to ensure compliance with ITApplication Architecture, Data Architecture, and Securitystandards.Ensure the ongoing maintenance and administration of all Weband Business Applications to ensure compliance with support vendorversions and security patching.Define, implement, monitor, and improve departmentalprocedures, methods, processes.Meet departmental budget guidelines. Deliver budget performancewithin +/- 5% of annual plan.Ensure the appropriate chargebacks, relevant MOUs, Statementsof Work, and confidentiality agreements are implementedcorrectly.Build strong partnerships and communication vehicles withrelevant units on campus and help set the direction for newtechnologies and the improved use of existing technologies. ResumeLetter of Interest Leadership experience in Higher EducationTen years of progressive leadership experience in identifyingand implementing enterprise application solutionsFive years of IT Project Management.last_img read more

Mt Ascutney collaborates with area schools to promote health

first_imgMt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center,Photo courtesy of Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center: Mt Ascutney Hospital and Health Center Collaborates with Hartland Elementary and Other Area Schools to Promote Health and Prevent Disease.Vermont Business Magazine As part of Vermont’s statewide public health initiative 3-4-50, Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center (MAHHC) is teaming up with local schools to cultivate an early interest in healthy behaviors among children and their families. MAHHC representatives are making a series of visits to area schools to encourage healthy choices, most recently at Hartland Elementary School in Hartland, Vermont.On April 6, Andrea Wooding, MPH, an intern from the Dartmouth Institute working at MAHHC, presented to 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade classes at Hartland Elementary School about the dangers of smoking, the benefits of exercise, and the importance of making fruits and vegetables a regular part of a healthy diet. Jill Lord, RN, MS, Director of Community Health, and Wooding returned to the school on Friday, May 25 to pass out free packets of carrot seeds with more health information, and to congratulate students on their commitment to their own health.The MAHHC presentations are part of the state of Vermont’s 3-4-50 program to educate people about three common behaviors that contribute to four preventable, chronic diseases that account for more than 50% of deaths in the state each year. Lack of exercise, poor diet, and tobacco use can have a serious negative impact on the quality of health and lifespan, by resulting in cancer, hypertension and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and lung disease.According to Lord, the presentations are designed to get young people thinking about the health choices they make, and how those choices can affect them later in life. “Prepackaged foods can be convenient and inexpensive, but their health costs are too high,” said Lord. “Our goal is to help young people and their families understand the lifelong benefits of making healthy dietary choices from an early age. We want the children to experience the health benefits of daily exercise, and not smoking. They can actually prevent disease by the choices they make.”Wooding, who holds a Masters in Public Health from the Dartmouth Institute, explained that students were involved in exercise games, coloring activities, and voting to elect their favorite vegetables. “That guided the selection of carrot seed packets which we handed out with instructions for planting, and reminders of their health benefits,” she explained. “Growing their own food helps them appreciate the process,” said Wooding, “because the more mindful and respectful we are of the things we eat, the more likely we are to eat healthily.”The presentations at Hartland Elementary School were coordinated in part with help from the school’s physical education and health teacher, Angela Carpenter-Henderson, who incorporated them into her regular health classes. “Jill and Andrea were a joy to work with,” said Carpenter-Henderson, “and a great example of how a spirit of collaboration and open communication can benefit the people all of us serve.”“Mt. Ascutney Hospital is helping to lead an Accountable Community for Health,” said Lord. That means bringing together partners from across the healthcare field with state agencies, local nonprofits, and others to integrate services, support prevention efforts like 3-4-50, and bolster education efforts. It’s part of our Hospital Strategic Plan, our Windsor HSA Community Collaborative, and it’s simply the right thing to do—for kids and our communities.” In addition to Hartland, MAHHC has also conducted presentations at schools in Plainfield, Cornish, Windsor, Weathersfield, and Brownsville.About Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health CenterFounded in 1933, Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center (MAHHC) is a not-for-profit community hospital network in Vermont including the critical access-designated Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Historic Homes of Runnemede, a senior residential care campus, in Windsor, as well as the Ottauquechee Health Center in Woodstock. Affiliated with the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health System, MAHHC provides primary care and a comprehensive suite of specialty services, along with 25 inpatient beds, a therapeutic pool and an acclaimed, fully modernized 10-bed Acute Rehabilitation Center. Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center is dedicated to improving the lives of those it serves and is at the hub of a wide network of community resources that have partnered to cover gaps in services, and improve overall population health. One of the largest employers in the area, MAHHC acknowledges its employees as its greatest asset and has been  recognized by the Governor’s Office with an Excellence in Worksite Wellness award.Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), is a recent recipient of Best Practice recognition by the National Rural Health Association (NRHA) for health care quality, and is recognized by the American Hospital Association (AHA) as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals for integration of technology to boost clinical performance.  The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) has awarded MAHHC with Level 3 status, the highest level of medical home designation.Source: ​WINDSOR, VT – Mt Ascutneylast_img read more

Merriam will continue charging county to use community center for nutrition program

first_imgThe Johnson County Nutrition Program uses the community center for its senior citizen meals.Merriam will continue to charge a fee for the Johnson County Nutrition Program to use the Irene B. French Community Center for its senior citizen meals program.The city council last week debated the request from the program to eliminate a $125 per month fee the city charges for the use of the community center for the senior citizens meal program at the center and the use of the center for Meals on Wheels.The Park and Recreation Committee recommended continuing the fee and the council agreed. Councilor Al Frisby voted against the fee. “I don’t think it looks good if we charge,” Frisby said. “We look greedy.”The program uses a portion of the facility five days each week, Parks and Recreation Director Anna Slocum said. The program itself is federally funded. In 2008, the nutrition site at Prairie Village was closed and in 2014 the Roeland Park center was closed and those participants were absorbed into the Merriam program, she said. The Merriam stipend was reduced from $200 per month to $125 per month in 2012. Several nutrition sites do not charge the program for facility use.Mayor Ken Sissom said he was torn about the right thing to do, but asked Slocum what the county charges Merriam to use Turkey Creek Park for Merriam’s annual Turkey Creek Festival. Slocum said the county charges several thousand dollars and the city asks for a fee waiver each year.Only Frisby voted against the motion to continue charging the monthly fee.last_img read more

Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgFred and Carol Logan addressed the crowd at the Johnson County Library Foundation’s Library Lets Loose party on Saturday. Photo via Susan Mong on Twitter.NEJC’s Logans serve as honorary hosts of Johnson County Library Foundation party. NEJC residents Fred and Carol Logan were the honorary hosts of Saturday’s Library Lets Loose celebration, a fundraising event marking the 20th anniversary of the Johnson County Library Foundation.Shawnee Mission School District enrollment down slightly. The SM School District reported it has 27,521 students enrolled for the 2016-17 school year, down 130 students from last year, about a 1/2 percent decline.Northeast Johnson County Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon is this Thursday. This month’s guest speaker is Adam Fichman, founder of Lifted Logic. This entrepreneur started his first business in college and was $2 million in debt by the time he was 19. He also had a couple of run-ins with Mark Zukerberg, founder of Facebook along the way to now owning a successful web development firm. The luncheon starts goes from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will be at the Deer Creek Golf Course, 7000 W. 133rd St. Cost is $30 for members, $40 for non-members. You can register here.Election office was not handing out federal voter registration form until pressed by reporters. The Kansas City Star reports that the Johnson County Election Office was not distributing a federal voter registration form that allows people to register without proof of U.S. citizenship until it was asked about whether withholding the form would violate the National Voter Registration Act. “We may have inadvertently made it awkward or some level of inconvenient,” Election Officer Ronnie Metsker said. “But I don’t think we’ve stopped anyone from actually getting registered.” [Johnson County election office changes course, says it will hand out federal registration form — The Kansas City Star]Scandal surrounding former Johnson County Election Officer grows. Brian Newby, who left his post as Johnson County Election Officer for a federal job last year, was involved in what the Associated Press dubs an “unfolding scandal” here in Kansas. Newby was having  an affair with a woman he had promoted in a previous job and used their relationship to cover up unauthorized expenses, according to the story. The AP also says Newby was abusive to his employees. [U.S. elections chief left behind scandal in Kansas — Associated Press]Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

Ambulance ad still chasing through Bar review

first_img Dec 19, 2019 Regular News Ambulance ad still chasing through Bar review Bar officials might feel they are being chased by this particular “ambulance.”For the second time, the Board of Governors will be considering, this time slightly modified from the original, a proposed lawyer billboard advertisement emblazoned with the words “Ambulances Chase Us.”The Board of Governors by an 18-14 vote in September upheld the Standing Committee on Advertising’s rejection of the ad. Bar staff felt the ad failed to comply with Bar advertising rules.Board and SCA members acknowledged the ad’s joke, but expressed concerns it still gave the wrong impression, since lawyers are not allowed to “chase” ambulances for business, and it’s illegal and unethical for ambulance drivers to refer potential clients to lawyers.The SCA at its December 12 meeting considered a revised ad. Tim Chinaris, who represents the law firm backing the ad, said board members told him after their September vote they felt the ad would be acceptable if it had a disclaimer.So now the proposed billboard features the image of a Post-It note thumbtacked on after “Ambulances Chase Us,” The note reads, “Not Really.” A further disclaimer has been added in a corner, referring to the image of a speeding ambulance, which says, “Images not based on actual events.”“We’ve tried to revise the ad to make clear it’s a play on words,” Chinaris told the ad committee. “We’ve tried to make it as clear as possible the ad is an attempt at humor. We hope it will be perceived as such by you…. It’s clear to anyone this is not a real representation.”Bar Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Tarbert said staff declined to issue a notice of compliance for the ad because the board had not given any guidance on what disclaimers might be acceptable when it rejected the first ad. That, she said, left it for the committee to decide.But it couldn’t.The panel first rejected a motion 5-7 to approve the staff decision not to issue a notice of compliance. But after further discussion a follow-up motion to approve the ad failed 6-7. That resulted in another motion to back staff, but that also failed 6-7.Finally, the committee voted 13-0 to refer the issue back to the Board of Governors (which hears appeals from committee actions) for further guidance.The issue is likely to be back before the Board of Governors at its March meeting.last_img read more

Eckstrom trying to rub off on Gophers’ green rookies

first_imgEckstrom trying to rub off on Gophers’ green rookiesShari Eckstrom is one of five seniors on the soccer team.Erin Westover, Daily File Photo Eckstrom Drew ClaussenSeptember 14, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrint Young teams need an experienced player who, along with coaches, helps others adjust to the college game.Shari Eckstrom fills that role for the Gophers soccer team. Eckstrom is one of five seniors on a team loaded with seven freshmen. âÄúThereâÄôs definitely a lot of pressure on me to lead the group, especially through adversity. WeâÄôve had a little bit of a hard start,âÄù Eckstrom said. Minnesota has consistently put pressure on its opponents, but has struggled to find the back of the net. The 119 shots through eight games have resulted in only 10 goals, leading the Gophers to search for answers.âÄúStepping up and being a leader has been a challenge, but IâÄôm going to continue to lead my team through the Big Ten season,âÄù Eckstrom added.The 2008 graduate of Champlin Park High School appeared in 21 games off the bench as a substitute when she was a freshman for Minnesota.  In her sophomore year she played in 19 games, 18 of which were starts. âÄúSheâÄôs seen it all. Her freshman year she came off the bench and she had to learn that way,âÄù said head coach Mikki Denney Wright. âÄúSheâÄôs learned from some of the great leaders in our program.âÄùHer junior year was her breakout year; she started all 23 games and scored seven goals with five assists. In her first three years, Eckstrom amassed 10 goals with nine assists. âÄúSheâÄôs a leader with her actions, sheâÄôs a leader vocally,âÄù said junior forward Nicole Baier. âÄúSheâÄôs always challenging everyone to be better.âÄùThis year she has one goal and two assists as Minnesota is attempting to turn around its poor start of the season as they start the Big Ten portion of their schedule this weekend. Eckstrom has dealt with a minor ankle injury early on this season, but has not missed a game.âÄúMy ultimate goal is to be Big Ten champs and go to the Final Four,âÄù Eckstrom said. Minnesota went to the Elite Eight last year but lost to Georgetown. âÄúRight now IâÄôm taking the Big Ten as a new season.âÄùThe Gophers will need to start converting scoring chances if they hope to compete with teams like Ohio State in the Big Ten. Eckstrom said she would like to either keep playing soccer or coach a team after graduation. For now, though, that seems miles off, as Minnesota opens conference play Sept. 18 with the Buckeyes, who made a trip to the Final Four last season.Young teams need an experienced player who, along with coaches, helps others adjust to the college game.Shari Eckstrom fills that role for the Gophers soccer team. Eckstrom is one of five seniors on a team loaded with seven freshmen. âÄúThereâÄôs definitely a lot of pressure on me to lead the group, especially through adversity. WeâÄôve had a little bit of a hard start,âÄù Eckstrom said. Minnesota has consistently put pressure on its opponents, but has struggled to find the back of the net. The 119 shots through eight games have resulted in only 10 goals, leading the Gophers to search for answers.âÄúStepping up and being a leader has been a challenge, but IâÄôm going to continue to lead my team through the Big Ten season,âÄù Eckstrom added.The 2008 graduate of Champlin Park High School appeared in 21 games off the bench as a substitute when she was a freshman for Minnesota.  In her sophomore year she played in 19 games, 18 of which were starts. âÄúSheâÄôs seen it all. Her freshman year she came off the bench and she had to learn that way,âÄù said head coach Mikki Denney Wright. âÄúSheâÄôs learned from some of the great leaders in our program.âÄùHer junior year was her breakout year; she started all 23 games and scored seven goals with five assists. In her first three years, Eckstrom amassed 10 goals with nine assists. âÄúSheâÄôs a leader with her actions, sheâÄôs a leader vocally,âÄù said junior forward Nicole Baier. âÄúSheâÄôs always challenging everyone to be better.âÄùThis year she has one goal and two assists as Minnesota is attempting to turn around its poor start of the season as they start the Big Ten portion of their schedule this weekend. Eckstrom has dealt with a minor ankle injury early on this season, but has not missed a game.âÄúMy ultimate goal is to be Big Ten champs and go to the Final Four,âÄù Eckstrom said. Minnesota went to the Elite Eight last year but lost to Georgetown. âÄúRight now IâÄôm taking the Big Ten as a new season.âÄùThe Gophers will need to start converting scoring chances if they hope to compete with teams like Ohio State in the Big Ten. Eckstrom said she would like to either keep playing soccer or coach a team after graduation. For now, though, that seems miles off, as Minnesota opens conference play Sept. 18 with the Buckeyes, who made a trip to the Final Four last season.Young teams need an experienced player who, along with coaches, helps others adjust to the college game.Shari Eckstrom fills that role for the Gophers soccer team. Eckstrom is one of five seniors on a team loaded with seven freshmen.âÄúThereâÄôs definitely a lot of pressure on me to lead the group, especially through adversity. WeâÄôve had a little bit of a hard start,âÄù Eckstrom said.Minnesota has consistently put pressure on its opponents, but has struggled to find the back of the net. The 119 shots through eight games have resulted in only 10 goals, leading the Gophers to search for answers.âÄúStepping up and being a leader has been a challenge, but IâÄôm going to continue to lead my team through the Big Ten season,âÄù Eckstrom added.The 2008 graduate of Champlin Park High School appeared in 21 games off the bench as a substitute when she was a freshman for Minnesota.  In her sophomore year she played in 19 games, 18 of which were starts.âÄúSheâÄôs seen it all. Her freshman year she came off the bench and she had to learn that way,âÄù said head coach Mikki Denney Wright. âÄúSheâÄôs learned from some of the great leaders in our program.âÄùHer junior year was her breakout year; she started all 23 games and scored seven goals with five assists. In her first three years, Eckstrom amassed 10 goals with nine assists. âÄúSheâÄôs a leader with her actions, sheâÄôs a leader vocally,âÄù said junior forward Nicole Baier. âÄúSheâÄôs always challenging everyone to be better.âÄùThis year she has one goal and two assists as Minnesota is attempting to turn around its poor start of the season as they start the Big Ten portion of their schedule this weekend.Eckstrom has dealt with a minor ankle injury early on this season, but has not missed a game.âÄúMy ultimate goal is to be Big Ten champs and go to the Final Four,âÄù Eckstrom said. Minnesota went to the Elite Eight last year but lost to Georgetown. âÄúRight now IâÄôm taking the Big Ten as a new season.âÄùThe Gophers will need to start converting scoring chances if they hope to compete with teams like Ohio State in the Big Ten.Eckstrom said she would like to either keep playing soccer or coach a team after graduation.For now, though, that seems miles off, as Minnesota opens conference play Sept. 18 with the Buckeyes, who made a trip to the Final Four last season.last_img read more

Polk Names Marc Bland to Lead Diversity and Inclusion

first_imgSOUTHFIELD, Mich. — Polk has named Marc Bland as the company’s head of diversity and inclusion.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement In his new role, Bland will have several responsibilities, including the development and enhancement of Polk’s multi-cultural business opportunities among client and supplier organizations. He also will serve as the primary adviser to senior leadership at Polk regarding diversity practices that support Polk’s overall business strategy and goals. Additionally, Bland will develop a long-term strategy, initiatives and processes for integrating diversity goals into Polk’s business practices. He also will work closely with the purchasing and human resources teams on supplier and workforce diversity and inclusion initiatives. “As we seek to help customers improve their marketing efforts with diverse audiences, Marc’s industry experience, product expertise and broad knowledge will be valuable for them,” said Tim Rogers, Polk president. “Continuing our drive to be an employer of choice, I’m also looking forward to working with Marc to build upon the internal diversity efforts we have in place currently at Polk.” Bland joined Polk in 1999 and has held several roles within the organization, including senior systems developer, solutions consultant and manager of the analytic solutions production team. He most recently served as product strategist within the strategy and planning team. During his career at Polk, Bland has been instrumental in helping the company reach multicultural agencies as well as being actively involved in speaking engagements at ethnic-based industry events such as the annual Rainbow Push Auto Symposium, the Target Market News Black Consumer Research Summit and the National Association of Minority Auto Dealers (NAMAD) National Conference. He has also been a key factor in helping form Polk’s partnership with the Decisive Media Group (formerly OnWheels).last_img read more

No. 7 UWF women’s tennis defeats Alabama Huntsville 9-0

first_img    HUNTSVILLE, Ala.  – The No. 7-ranked University of West Florida women’s tennis team defeated Alabama Huntsville 9-0 on the road Sunday afternoon. West Florida (4-0, 3-0 GSC) wraps up the weekend road trip with three 9-0 wins over conference opponents.The No. 20-ranked singles player in DII, Monika Kochanova (Bratislava, Slovakia), won 6-0, 6-0 at number one singles. Laure-Eline Faure (Toulouse, France) won 6-2, 6-3 at number two singles while Nina Bubelova (Považská Bystrica, Slovakia) won at number three singles 6-1, 6-0.Kochanova and Faure won 8-3 at number one doubles while Kat Dikosavljevic (Queensland, Australia) and Francesca Fanchin (New York, N.Y.) won a close match at number two doubles 9-8. Bubelova and Fernanda Amaral (Curitiba, Brazil) won 8-6 at number three doubles.West Florida will next play host to No. 15 Florida Tech on Saturday, March 1 at 1 p.m. CT.For information on all UWF athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com.#ARGOS# Print Friendly Version Share No. 7 UWF women’s tennis defeats Alabama Huntsville 9-0center_img Senior Monika Kochanova got three wins in singles play over the weekend to improve to 3-1 on the year. (Photo by Bill Stockland) last_img read more

‘Watch What Happens Live!’ host Andy Cohen’s going to be a dad

first_imgCharles Sykes/Bravo(NEW YORK) — Congratulations to Andy Cohen!  The Watch What Happens Live! host is about to become a dad.Cohen revealed the news on Thursday night’s show in front of guests that included Real Housewives franchise stars Teresa Giudice, Vicki Gunvalson, Nene Leakes, Kyle Richards and Ramona Singer.  Addressing them and his viewers — “my friends at home” — Cohen dropped the news.“Tonight, I want you to be the first to know that after many years of careful deliberation, a fair amount of prayers and the benefit of science, if all goes according to plan in about six weeks’ time, I am gonna become father,” Cohen revealed, to cheers from the Housewives stars and others in the studio.Cohen, 50, said it was all “thanks to a wonderful surrogate who is carrying my future,” adding that having a family is “something that I have wanted for my entire life.”No other details about the impending birth as yet, including the baby’s sex.  It’ll be Cohen’s first child.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more