Starlets’ destiny in our own hands, says Ouma

first_img0Shares0000Harambee-Starlets head coach David Ouma during training.PHOTO/Raymond Makhaya.NAIROBI, April 11- Harambee Starlets head coach David Ouma has retained his starting lineup that held Algeria to a 2-2 draw away in Algiers ahead of Tuesday’s 2016 Africa Cup of Nations return leg in the final qualifier at Safaricom Kasarani Stadium.Starlets are one match away from making history as the first Kenyan women’s team to qualify for the Nations Cup and they just need at least a goalless draw in the second-leg to book a ticket to the finals scheduled for Cameroon in November. “History is in sight for us and that is a big motivation already. We want to be the first ever Kenyan girls to play at the African Cup of Nations. We know we have the advantage and we want to make good use of it,” assistant captain Mary Kinuthia said after the team’s recovery training session at the match venue Monday morning.The team was heading for a historic win after rallying from behind to lead 2-1 but a last minute equalizer earned Algeria some hopes in the return leg.They came up against an experienced Algerian side that has been to four Women’s AFCON, but Kinuthia disclosed they had to fight until the end to ensure they stay on course to fulfilling their dream.“We knew we were going to meet a tough and experienced side which has players playing in Europe, but we motivated ourselves knowing we could upset them. It was only unfortunate to concede in the last minute but even the draw was not a bad result,” the striker added.Harambee Starlets’ Tabaka Chacha vies for the ball against captain Anne Aluoch.PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaAlgeria captain Fatima Sekouane scored a 78th minute own goal to hand Kenya a lifeline into the match with high school sensation Mwanahalima Adam scoring the second in the 85th minute before Bouhane found the leveler for Algeria in the 89th minute.Adam will be aiming to score in front of home fans, outlining that their target is to win the tie and not a draw.“We must show them that we are also a tough team and they can’t beat us at home. We can’t afford to lose and having scored away, I also must score at home. I have hope we will qualify for AFCON,” Mwanahalima warned.Ouma will be without midfielder Elizabeth Mwikali, who picked up a knock on the hip in the first-leg but he will be boosted with the return of Jacky Ogol who missed the trip to Algeria with a knee injury.Dorcas Shikobe and Wendy Achieng have also managed to shake off knocks on their ankles and trained well with the rest of the team.With Football Kenya Federation waiving entry charges for the clash, Ouma has called on fans to come out in large numbers and cheer them up.“The results previously have not been good but tomorrow (Tuesday) we have a chance and fans should come and support the Starlets because that’s the only way they can motivate the girls. We promise not to disappoint them,” Ouma urged.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

West Brom land Liverpool defender on season-long loan deal

first_img Andre Wisdom in action for Derby last season West Brom have signed Liverpool defender Andre Wisdom on a season-long loan deal.The 21-year-old full-back spent the majority of last season on loan at Championship side Derby.Now he will gain valuable experience in the Premier League with the Baggies.Albion head coach Alan Irvine said: “I’m delighted to welcome Andre to the club.“I’ve spoken to Brendan Rodgers, who I’ve known for a very long time and who I trust implicitly. He said Andre would do a good job for us. That was reassuring. “You want to find out about the person. You can see the player but you want to find out what they are like as a person. Brendan spoke very, very highly about him. “He’s a versatile lad. He’s played as a right-back for Liverpool in the Premier League last season, he also played as a full-back for Derby. “He grew up as a centre-back and played on the left side of central defence for Liverpool against Preston on Saturday.”Technical director Terry Burton added: “Andre has been schooled at Liverpool and as a result has a good football education.“He has gained good experience last year and with the England Under-21s.“He’s a good defender and he looks to enjoy stopping the opposition from playing which is a quality we want our players to have.” 1last_img read more

Owner to pay €150 to charity after eleven people found after-hours in bar

first_imgThe owner of a West Donegal bar has been ordered to pay €150 to St Vincent De Paul after a number of people were found drinking on the premises after hours.Gardai called to the Corner Bar in Falcarragh at 11.49pm and found eleven people drinking on the premises. Solicitor John Canon told Falcarragh District Court that the people were waiting on taxis to arrive to take them home.Mr Canon said the owner of the bar, Ms Sally Whoriskey had a clean record and had no previous convictions for after-hours drinking under Section 18 of the Intoxicating Liquor Act.Judge Paul Kelly said he would strike the matter out if Ms Whoriskey made a donation of €150 to St Vincent De Paul.Owner to pay €150 to charity after eleven people found after-hours in bar was last modified: September 26th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

2014 WIAA girls volleyball regional schedule released

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterThe brackets for the upcoming 2104 WIAA state girls volleyball playoffs were revealed Thursday.Regional quarterfinals in Divisions 2, 3 and 4 will be held Tuesday, Oct. 21. Regional semifinals in all four divisions are set for Thursday, Oct. 23, and regional finals are on Saturday, Oct. 25.Sectionals will be held Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, with the survivors earning a spot at the 2014 WIAA State Girls Volleyball Championships at Resch Center in Green Bay on Nov. 6-8.Locally, Marshfield is the No. 8 seed in the Division 1 Sectional 1 bracket and will host No. 9 Hudson in a regional semifinal next Thursday. The winner plays at No. 1 seed Eau Claire Memorial in a regional final on Oct. 25.In Division 3, Spencer and Auburndale are the top two seeds in the same quarter of the Sectional 2 bracket.No. 1 Spencer hosts No. 8 Lincoln and No. 2 Auburndale will be at home against No. 7 Necedah in regional quarterfinals on Tuesday.Stratford is the No. 5 seed in the another Sectional 2 bracket and will play at No. 4 Cadott in a regional quarterfinal Tuesday.Marshfield Columbus Catholic earned a No. 5 seed in the Division 4 Sectional 2 bracket and will open with a regional quarterfinal at No. 4 Prentice next Tuesday.All matches start at 7 p.m.Here is a look at the entire state regional pairings:2014 WIAA State Girls Volleyball PlayoffsDivision 1Sectional 1Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Eau Claire Memorial byeNo. 9 Hudson at No. 8 MarshfieldNo. 12 Wausau West at No. 5 River FallsNo. 13 Wausau East at No. 4 D.C. EverestNo. 14 Wisconsin Rapids at No. 3 Chippewa FallsNo. 11 Menomonie at No. 6 Stevens PointNo. 10 Superior at No. 7 Eau Claire NorthNo. 2 Merrill byeSectional 5Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Mukwonago byeNo. 9 Sussex Hamilton at No. 8 Waukesha WestNo. 12 Port Washington at No. 5 Menomonee FallsNo. 13 Waukesha North at No. 4 Hartland ArrowheadNo. 11 Waukesha South at No. 6 GermantownNo. 10 Kettle Moraine at No. 7 Mequon HomesteadNo. 15 Milwaukee Vincent at No. 2 OconomowocSectional 2Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Kimberly byeNo. 9 Pulaski at No. 8 Bay PortNo. 12 Appleton West at No. 5 KaukaunaNo. 13 Green Bay East at No. 4 De PereNo. 14 Green Bay West at No. 3 Appleton NorthNo. 11 Green Bay Southwest at No. 6 HortonvilleNo. 10 Ashwaubenon at No. 7 Green Bay PrebleNo. 2 Appleton East byeSectional 8Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Milwaukee Divine Savior Holy Angels byeNo. 9 Milwaukee King at No. 8 Wauwatosa EastNo. 12 Milwaukee Bay View/Lifelong Learning at No. 5 Wauwatosa WestNo. 13 Milwaukee South at No. 4 Glendale NicoletNo. 14 Milwaukee Bradley at No. 3 Brookfield CentralNo. 11 Milwaukee Pulaski/Arts at No. 6 Milwaukee Pius XINo. 10 Milwaukee Riverside at No. 7 Whitefish BayNo. 15 Milwaukee Washington/Science/Career Tech at No. 2 Brookfield EastSectional 3Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 DeForest byeNo. 9 Madison Memorial at No. 8 Monona GroveNo. 12 Madison West at No. 5 MiddletonNo. 13 Tomah at No. 4 WaunakeeNo. 14 Madison La Follette at No. 3 Sun PrairieNo. 11 Holmen at No. 6 La Crosse CentralNo. 10 Onalaska at No. 7 BarabooNo. 15 Madison East at No. 2 VeronaSectional 7Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Greendale byeNo. 9 West Allis Central at No. 8 Oak CreekNo. 12 Racine Park at No. 5 Racine HorlickNo. 13 Milwaukee Reagan at No. 4 GreenfieldNo. 14 Milwaukee Hamilton at No. 3 Union GroveNo. 11 Racine Case at No. 6 FranklinNo. 10 South Milwaukee at No. 7 West Allis HaleNo. 2 Muskego byeSectional 4Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Manitowoc byeNo. 9 Slinger at No. 8 Fond du LacNo. 12 Sheboygan South at No. 5 West Bend WestNo. 13 Oshkosh North at No. 4 Oshkosh WestNo. 14 Menasha at No. 3 West Bend EastNo. 11 Sheboygan North at No. 6 CedarburgNo. 10 Beaver Dam at No. 7 HartfordNo. 2 Neenah byeSectional 6Regional semifinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Burlington byeNo. 9 Oregon at No. 8 Kenosha Indian TrailNo. 12 Kenosha Bradford at No. 5 Janesville CraigNo. 13 Stoughton at No. 4 Fort AtkinsonNo. 14 Wilmot at No. 3 Westosha CentralNo. 11 Janesville Parker at No. 6 MiltonNo. 10 Lake Geneva Badger at No. 7 WaterfordNo. 15 Beloit Memorial at No. 2 Kenosha TremperDivision 2Sectional 1Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Barron byeNo. 5 Northwestern at No. 4 Rice LakeNo. 6 Amery at No. 3 HaywardNo. 7 Spooner at No. 2 AshlandNo. 1 Prescott byeNo. 5 Somerset at No. 4 New RichmondNo. 6 Ellsworth at No. 3 Baldwin-WoodvilleNo. 7 St. Croix Central at No. 2 OsceolaNo. 8 Lakeland at No. 1 TomahawkNo. 5 Medford at No. 4 AntigoNo. 6 Rhinelander at No. 3 Northland PinesNo. 7 Wittenberg-Birnamwood at No. 2 MosineeNo. 1 Altoona byeNo. 5 La Crosse Logan at No. 4 Black River FallsNo. 6 Sparta at No. 3 Gale-Ettrick-TrempealeauNo. 7 Nekoosa at No. 2 West SalemSectional 2Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Green Bay Notre Dame byeNo. 5 Clintonville at No. 4 ShawanoNo. 6 Peshtigo at No. 3 Oconto FallsNo. 7 Marinette at No. 2 SeymourNo. 1 Luxemburg-Casco byeNo. 5 Southern Door at No. 4 West De PereNo. 6 Sturgeon Bay at No. 3 WrightstownNo. 7 Two Rivers at No. 2 DenmarkNo. 1 Waupun byeNo. 9 New London at No. 8 FreedomNo. 12 Lomira at No. 5 WaupacaNo. 13 Omro at No. 4 WinneconneNo. 14 North Fond du Lac at No. 3 Fox Valley LutheranNo. 11 Ripon at No. 6 BerlinNo. 10 Wautoma at No. 7 Little ChuteNo. 2 Appleton Xavier byeSectional 3Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 8 Viroqua at No. 1 Sauk PrairieNo. 5 Lodi at No. 4 Adams-FrinedshipNo. 6 Reedsburg at No. 3 PortageNo. 7 Mauston at No. 2 Wisconsin DellsNo. 1 River Valley byeNo. 5 Richland Center at No. 4 Prairie du ChienNo. 6 Dodgeville at No. 3 Madison EdgewoodNo. 7 Mount Horeb at No. 2 PlattevilleNo. 1 Lakeside Lutheran byeNo. 5 Lake Mills at No. 4 Watertown Luther PrepNo. 6 Columbus at No. 3 McFarlandNo. 7 Marshall at No. 2 JeffersonNo. 8 Monroe at No. 1 EdgertonNo. 5 Clinton at No. 4 EvansvilleNo. 6 Beloit Turner at No. 3 Big FootNo. 7 Whitewater at No. 2 Delavan-DarienSectional 4Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Sheboygan Falls byeNo. 5 Kiel at No. 4 ChiltonNo. 6 Mayville at No. 3 PlymouthNo. 7 Kewaskum at No. 2 CampbellsportNo. 1 Kettle Moraine Lutheran byeNo. 5 University School of Milwaukee at No. 4 Brown DeerNo. 6 Milwaukee Languages at No. 3 Milwaukee LuthearnNo. 7 Milwaukee Morse-Marshall at No. 2 GraftonNo. 8 Milwaukee Messmer at No. 1 Waukesha Catholic MemorialNo. 5 Pewaukee at No. 4 Wisconsin LutheranNo. 6 New Berlin West at No. 3 ShorewoodNo. 7 Milwaukee Tenor/Veritas at No. 2 New Berlin EisenhowerNo. 1 East Troy byeNo. 5 Elkhorn at No. 4 CudahyNo. 6 St. Francis at No. 3 Milwaukee St. Thomas MoreNo. 7 Milwaukee St. Anthony at No. 2 WhitnallDivision 3Sectional 1Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 8 Chetek-Weyerhaeuser at No. 1 CameronNo. 5 Flambeau at No. 4 HurleyNo. 6 Chequamegon at No. 3 BloomerNo. 7 Ladysmith at No. 2 PhillipsNo. 8 Glenwood City at No. 1 ColfaxNo. 5 Unity at No. 4 BoycevilleNo. 6 Cumberland at No. 3 WebsterNo. 7 St. Croix Falls at No. 2 GrantsburgNo. 8 Durand at No. 1 Fall CreekNo. 5 Mondovi at No. 4 Spring ValleyNo. 6 Osseo-Fairchild at No. 3 Elk MoundNo. 7 Augusta at No. 2 Eau Claire RegisNo. 8 Melrose-Mindoro at No. 1 ArcadiaNo. 5 Brookwood at No. 4 WestbyNo. 6 Whitehall at No. 3 Cochrane-Fountain CityNo. 7 Onalaska Luther at No. 2 La Crosse AquinasSectional 2Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Bonduel byeNo. 5 Crivitz at No. 4 ColemanNo. 6 Crandon at No. 3 OcontoNo. 7 Menominee Indian at No. 2 Wabeno/LaonaNo. 8 Manawa at No. 1 Oshkosh LourdesNo. 5 Shiocton at No. 4 Iola-ScandinaviaNo. 6 Neenah St. Mary Central at No. 3 RosholtNo. 7 Amherst at No. 2 Weyauwega-FremontNo. 8 Thorp at No. 1 MarathonNo. 5 Stratford at No. 4 CadottNo. 6 Edgar at No. 3 AthensNo. 7 Colby at No. 2 Stanley-BoydNo. 8 Lincoln at No. 1 SpencerNo. 5 Loyal/Granton at No. 4 NeillsvilleNo. 6 New Lisbon at No. 3 Stevens Point PacelliNo. 7 Necedah at No. 2 AuburndaleSectional 3Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Wisconsin Heights byeNo. 5 Fennimore at No. 4 Iowa-GrantNo. 6 Lancaster at No. 3 RiverdaleNo. 7 Boscobel at No. 2 Mineral PointNo. 1 Cuba City byeNo. 5 New Glarus at No. 4 BellevilleNo. 6 Darlington at No. 3 ParkviewNo. 2 Brodhead byeNo. 8 Winnebago Lutheran at No. 1 Fond du Lac St. Mary’s SpringsNo. 5 Princeton/Green Lake at No. 4 WestfieldNo. 6 Pardeeville at No. 3 LaconiaNo. 7 Montello at No. 2 MarkesanNo. 1 Waterloo byeNo. 5 Horicon at No. 4 DodgevilleNo. 6 Palmyra-Eagle at No. 3 CambridgeNo. 7 Poynette at No. 2 DeerfieldSectional 4Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 8 Mishicot at No. 1 Manitowoc LutheranNo. 5 Brillion at No. 4 ReedsvilleNo. 6 Kewaunee at No. 3 GibraltarNo. 7 Manitowoc Roncalli at No. 2 AlgomaNo. 1 Howards Grove byeNo. 5 Cedar Grove-Belgium at No. 4 New HolsteinNo. 6 Valders at No. 3 Random LakeNo. 7 Kohler at No. 2 OostburgNo. 1 Lake Country Lutheran byeNo. 9 Ozaukee at No. 8 Glendale Martin LutherNo. 12 Eastbrook Academy/Hope Academy at No. 5 Shoreland LutheranNo. 13 Milwaukee Carmen at No. 4 Kenosha St. JosephNo. 3 Kenosha Christian LifeNo. 11 Whitefish Bay Dominican at No. 6 Racine LutheranNo. 10 The Prairie School at No. 7 Brookfield AcademyNo. 2 Racine St. Catherine’s byeDivision 4Sectional 1Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Washburn byeNo. 5 Bayfield at No. 4 South ShoreNo. 6 Solon Springs at No. 3 MellenNo. 7 Drummond at No. 2 MercerNo. 1 Winter byeNo. 5 Lac Courte Oreilles at No. 4 NorthwoodNo. 6 Birchwood at No. 3 Shell LakeNo. 7 Butternut at No. 2 SirenNo. 1 Luck byeNo. 5 Frederic at No. 4 Prairie FarmNo. 6 Clear Lake at No. 3 Turtle LakeNo. 7 Elmwood at No. 2 ClaytonNo. 8 New Auburn at No. 1 Chippewa Falls McDonellNo. 5 Bruce at No. 4 Owen-WitheeNo. 6 Gilman at No. 3 Lake HolcombeNo. 7 Cornell at No. 2 Eau Claire Immanuel LutheranSectional 2Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 8 Wisconsin Valley Lutheran at No. 1 Wausau Newman CatholicNo. 5 Marshfield Columbus Catholic at No. 4 PrenticeNo. 6 Rib Lake at No. 3 GreenwoodNo. 7 Northland Lutheran at No. 2 AbbotsfordNo. 8 Marion at No. 1 Wild RoseNo. 5 Tigerton at No. 4 Port EdwardsNo. 6 Pittsville at No. 3 Tri-CountyNo. 7 Almond-Bancroft at No. 2 Wisconsin Rapids AssumptionNo. 8 White Lake at No. 1 NiagaraNo. 5 Pembine/Goodman at No. 4 Three LakesNo. 6 Wausaukee at No. 3 ElchoNo. 7 Phelps at No. 2 FlorenceNo. 1 Suring byeNo. 5 Lena at No. 4 GillettNo. 6 St. Thomas Aquinas at No. 3 GreshamNo. 7 Oneida Nation at No. 2 BowlerSectional 3Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 1 Plum City byeNo. 5 Gilmanton at No. 4 Blair-TaylorNo. 6 Independence at No. 3 PepinNo. 7 Eleva-Strum at No. 2 AlmaNo. 8 Weston at No. 1 RoyallNo. 5 Bangor at No. 4 Wonewoc-CenterNo. 6 La Farge at No. 3 CashtonNo. 7 Kickapoo at No. 2 HillsboroNo. 8 Wauzeka-Steuben at No. 1 North CrawfordNo. 5 Ithaca at No. 4 HighlandNo. 6 Cassville at No. 3 SenecaNo. 7 De Soto at No. 2 River RidgeNo. 8 Pecatonica at No. 1 SouthwesternNo. 5 Benton at No. 4 BelmontNo. 6 Barneveld at No. 3 ArgyleNo. 7 Shullsburg at No. 2 PotosiSectional 4Regional quarterfinals, Oct. 23No. 8 Stockbridge at No. 1 HilbertNo. 5 Sevastopol at No. 4 Sheboygan ChristianNo. 6 Elkhart Lake-Glenbeulah at No. 3 Sheboygan LutheranNo. 7 Oshkosh Valley Christian at No. 2 Green Bay NEW LutheranNo. 1 Waupun Central Wisconsin Christian byeNo. 5 Oakfield at No. 4 University LakeNo. 6 Milwaukee Salam at No. 3 Living Word LuthearnNo. 7 Milwaukee Juneau at No. 2 Milwaukee Heritage ChristianNo. 8 Rio at No. 1 HustisfordNo. 5 Cambria-Friesland at No. 4 Abundant Life Christian/Madison Country DayNo. 6 Johnson Creek at No. 3 RandolphNo. 7 Wayland Academy at No. 2 Fall RiverNo. 1 Monticello byeNo. 5 Faith Christian at No. 4 JudaNo. 6 Black Hawk at No. 3 Williams BayNo. 7 Albany at No. 2 Burlington Catholic Central(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of  MarshfieldAreaSports.com).last_img read more

Red Bull mobile coming to South Africa

first_imgRay Maota People who take up contracts with Red Bull Mobile will receive Red Bull branded smartphones and exclusive content. (Image: Ray Maota) Red Bull headquarters are situated in Fuschl am See in Austria and take theshape of two volcanoes, symbolising power and energy. (Image: Flickr) MEDIA CONTACTS •Red Bull South Africa +27 21 486 8000 •Vinnie Santu Media Relations Cell C +27 11 324 4919 RELATED ARTICLES • High-speed internet from Cell C • Mobile networks in tower-sharing deal • Mobile opportunities in Africa • SA surfer wins US ‘Superbowl’ Energy drink giant Red Bull will soon launch a mobile virtual network operation (MVNO) in South Africa, becoming the second player to do so after Virgin Mobile established itself in the country in 2006.The new South African venture will be a partnership between the beverage company and mobile network operator Cell C.The MVNO will be officially launched in Johannesburg on 8 February 2011. Details over pricing and the network’s range have yet to be confirmed.Initially, Red Bull Mobile will only offer contract deals, no pre-paid option. Those who sign up for contracts will receive branded smartphones offering mobile TV services featuring extreme sports.Consumers will also be able to download Red Bull content including music, wallpapers, games and videos.Red Bull Mobile has already established MVNOs in Switzerland, Hungary and Austria, and will be launching in Germany soon.It will join Virgin Mobile, of the Richard Branson-run Virgin Group, in utilising Cell C’s infrastructure.Virgin Mobile, a 50-50 partnership between Cell C and the Virgin Group, have not been as successful as they’d hoped to be in South Africa, admitting that their initial aspirations were to gain a 10% share of the market. The group now says it will settle for 1%.“Virgin Mobile banked on mobile number portability at its inception, but this did not pay off because South Africans are seemingly reluctant to change service providers,” said Spiwe Chireka of Frost & Sullivan, mobile-operator analysts.In light of Virgin’s dwindled market share, Cell C is rumoured to be considering selling its stake in Virgin Mobile to mobile phone distributor Allied Mobile.Value-adding the keyDespite the lack of market penetration by Virgin Mobile, analysts say they have faith in Red Bull Mobile.BMI-TechKnowledge MD Denis Smit said: “It’s no longer good enough to bring in a player that is only trying to claw at (mobile phone) minutes. They must be able to provide value to subscribers on top of those minutes and Red Bull can do this.“Red Bull is a marketing giant and can take advantage of promotion opportunities that come along with a niche mobile service.”BMI-TechKnowledge is a commercial and industrial research company.Andrew Snead, who works closely with Cell C and is a senior partner at telecoms consulting group Delta Partners, said: “For an MVNO to work anywhere in the world, it needs to have a clear value proposition.“MVNOs can offer something different but they have to keep the economics in mind. They must offer unique value to customers, perhaps by providing discounted tariffs, or offering value-adding content.”Massive successRed Bull was created in 1984 by Austrian entrepreneur Dietrich Mateschitz, who had become aware of the growing popularity of energy tonic drinks in Asia.Today, Red Bull’s headquarters are based in Fuschl am See, Austria, and are built to resemble two volcanoes symbolising power and energy.After developing a unique marketing campaign, Mateschitz began selling his product Austria in 1987, and the brand soon took off.Today its product line consists of Red Bull Energy Drink, Red Bull Sugarfree, Red Bull Cola and Red Bull Energy Shots.Nearly 4-billion cans of Red Bull are consumed every year.Red Bull hosts about 400 events in South Africa every year, ranging from surfing competitions, adventure sports, high-profile music events and the popular Red Bull Box Cart Race. Internationally, it also sponsors Formula One races.Third mobile network in SA Cell C was launched in South Africa in 2001 as the country’s third mobile network operator. Nowadays it has just over 6-million users.In November 2010 the operator introduced its much-anticipated internet network.Cell C’s CEO Lars Reichelt said at that launch: “It’s a high-speed packet access plus (HSPA+) with more bandwidth speed than that offered by other operators.” Other operators use only HSPA, making Cell C’s network faster.Cell C’s internet network has access to a 1 600km fibre-optic cable and 2 000 transmitters. It’s been working with companies like Neotel, Dark Fibre Africa and Nokia Siemens Networks to improve its functionality.last_img read more

Retail ORC and Law Enforcement Investigators Gather in Atlanta for “Last” GRAORCA Conference

first_imgNearly 400 loss prevention investigators and their law enforcement partners from the greater Atlanta region met to network and hear multiple keynote speakers and retail case studies at the 8th annual Georgia Retail Association Organized Retail Crime Alliance (GRAORCA) conference at the downtown Hyatt Regency on Wednesday, August 29.The event began with welcome remarks from Georgia Senator Tyler Harper and Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard. In his remarks, Howard told the audience that he is asking to hire a full-time assistant DA and a dedicated investigator to focus totally on reducing retail crime. If his budget request is granted, his office plans to create programs with the goal of reducing retail crime by 10 percent, reduce ORC by 20 percent, and increase prosecutions by 20 percent by the end of 2019.Three keynote speakers addressed the audience throughout the day. The morning speaker was Kimberly Overton, the chief resource prosecutor for the North Carolina Conference of District Attorneys. She provided an energetic presentation on the four types of ways people learn and the importance of matching your communication style to the person you are trying to influence.- Sponsor – The mid-day keynote was offered by Tom Meehan, CSO and CISO for Controltek and retail technology editor for LP Magazine, who gave an overview of tools and techniques for accessing the dark web for investigations.Describing her afternoon keynote as “not a typical keynote,” Judge Glenda Hatchett, who is well known for the reality court TV program Judge Hatchett, gave a moving talk about “finding your purpose and passion.”One highlight of the day was the presentation by Target of the GRAORCA Partnership of the Year award to Detective Jesus Maldonado of the Dunwoody Police Department.There were multiple breakout sessions throughout the day on a variety of topics. Two sessions that stood out focused on retail ORC investigation case studies. Patrick Fairley Sr., ORC investigator for the Southern division of Home Depot, described details of a year-long investigation of a box-stuffing theft ring that hit more than 90 Home Depot stores in Florida and Georgia. Tim Huff, director of ORC investigations, and Marcelo Bravo, ORC manager, described Macy’s use of RFID for asset protection and “shortage avoidance” that has produced significant ROI.The day ended with Chad McManus, CFE, CFI, LPC, field loss prevention manager for T-Mobile and chair of the Georgia Retailers Association LP committee, telling the attendees that the GRAORCA organization name has officially changed to the Georgia Retailers Organized Crime Alliance or GROC (pronounced GEE-rock).Despite the name change, the organization will continue its mission of promoting retailer-law enforcement partnership to reduce organized retail crime in Georgia and the Southeast. Details about next year’s conference will be announced at a later date. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Analyzing Facebook: Sysomos Adds Public Facebook Updates to Its Analytics Platform

first_imgNow that Facebook allows developers to store data for more than 24 hours, social media analytics firms like Sysomos are finally able to include public updates from Facebook users in their databases. Sysomos began surfacing this data on some of its customers’ accounts yesterday and plans to roll these new features out to the rest of its users soon. Given the size of Facebook’s user base, being able to analyze this data will be a major boon for anybody who is interested in tracking these kinds of updates. Tags:#Facebook#news#privacy#web Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… frederic lardinois Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Sysomos already allowed its users to search and analyze Facebook fan pages and groups for the last few months through its MAP analytics tool. The company now also includes these updates in Heartbeat, Sysomos’ social media monitoring tool. Sysomos’ integration of the Open Graph API will surface all the activity that has been made public by a user, including status updates and public wall posts. Thanks to Sysomos’ new ability to analyze and search public Facebook updates, we were, for example, able to track the backlash against Facebook’s “instant personalization.” According to Sysomos, only about 15% of the public updates about this topic were positive.Are Facebook Users Aware that their Updates Will Live a Second Life in Social Media Analytics Tools?Sysomos, of course, only pulls in public updates, but we have to wonder if most Facebook users are aware that their updates will end up in the vast data repositories of firms like Sysomos and Radian6. Given the current backlash against what some users perceive as an invasion of their privacy by Facebook, it will be interesting to see how Facebook users will react to this. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Can States Sue on Greenhouse Gas as a ‘Nuisance’? High Court Asks

first_imgAs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is busy girding itself for a fight over new greenhouse gas emissions rules, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments today in a case on whether lawsuits over climate ought to be permitted.At stake is whether greenhouse gas pollution may be considered a “nuisance” under U.S. law. The case stems from two 2004 federal lawsuits brought by seven states and several land-trust groups alleging that emissions from five major power companies could cause harm by contributing to global warming. Rising sea levels, loss of water in the Great Lakes, and reduced hydropower were among the injuries alleged by the plaintiffs; the lawsuits have since been combined, and two states have dropped out since the original suit was filed. The district court subsequently said in its decision that the case brought up a “political” question that the other branches of government, not the judicial branch, should consider, but an appeals court reversed that ruling. When the power companies appealed, the Supreme Court took the case.In other pollution cases, the Supreme Court has supported suits claiming that pollution caused harm as a “nuisance” under common law, most often interpreted to prohibit noise and light pollution. The 80 minutes of occasionally spirited argument at the high court this morning focused on the two main issues in the greenhouse gas litigation: For the case to go forward, the plaintiffs must prove that the case has legal standing (they must show that the court is the right venue for resolving this dispute), and that the common law definition of nuisance can support suits over greenhouse gases. On the issue of standing, the court could rule that Congress or EPA is a more appropriate body to deal with pollution control. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The Obama Administration opposed the suing states in this case largely on grounds that they lack standing, marking a rare instance in which the Administration finds itself at odds with environmentalists on a major legal issue. (Environmentalists urged the states to try this legal strategy.) U.S. attorney Neal Katyal told the justices that the complexity of the issue suggests that the executive branch, namely EPA, is a better venue for controlling such an expansive type of pollution rather than the courts. “In the 222 years that this court has been sitting, it has never heard a case with so many potential perpetrators and so many potential victims,” he said in his opening remarks. “There are billions of emitters of greenhouse gasses on the planet and billions of potential victims as well.”The attorneys for the power companies and the Obama Administration argued that the greenhouse gases case is fundamentally different from previous nuisance cases in which pollutants have played a central role. A landmark ruling by the Supreme Court in 1907, for example, found that a judge could stop a Tennessee copper company from polluting the Georgia environment under the nuisance doctrine. Such cases, Katyal said, “are essentially: A pollutes a river or something and hurts B.” But in the case of global warming pollution, he said, “A here is the world and B is the world, and that is such a difference in scale and scope to pose enormously difficult questions” about whether such suits should go forward.If this case is allowed to proceed, asked the justices, should subsequent cases be limited to big polluters like the five targeted in this suit? “Your briefs talk a lot about how these are the five largest [U.S.] emissions producers, but I saw nothing in your theory to limit it to those five,” Justice Elena Kagan asked New York state attorney Barbara Underwood, who spoke on behalf of the six states in the suit. “Is there something that you think limits it to large emissions producers rather than anybody in the world?”The states have argued that the larger the greenhouse gas emitter the stronger the connection linking pollution and potential harm. “These defendants,” Underwood said, speaking of the five polluters, “produce 650 million tons a year or 10% of U.S. emissions, and individually they produce amounts ranging from 1 to 3.5% of U.S. emissions.” Those who challenged the states also suggested that courts would be ill-equipped to make the complex judgments that big regulatory agencies staffed with scientists and other experts make on a routine basis. Judges lack “the resources, the expertise” to be a “kind of super-EPA,” said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But Underwood said courts could make such judgments—which could include determining how “substantial” an emitter must be to be found culpable—by relying on standards set by the agencies. She pointed to a cutoff set by EPA that limits regulated greenhouse gas polluters to those that emit 100,000 tons or more per year. “According to EPA’s own technical data, there would be at most a few thousand potential defendants.”Because Justice Sonia Sotomayor recused herself—she sat on the panel that reviewed the issue in the appeals court—only eight justices heard the arguments. A 4-4 tie would mean litigation against the polluters could go forward, because that would leave in effect the earlier decision by the appeals court. While the tone of the questioning was largely skeptical toward the idea that such suits ought to go forward, divining a final ruling from the rough-and-tumble of oral argument can be difficult, especially because justices often ask tough questions of those they’re inclined to agree with—just to test their counterarguments. Eyes were squarely focused today on Justice Anthony Kennedy, often the swing judge when decisions are split 5-4 in favor of conservative decisions. Kennedy raised a concern that federal law, and EPA’s efforts to use that law, would necessarily “preempt” the common law. The court’s three liberal members, Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, and Kagan, seemed skeptical on this issue, too. At least one knowledgeable observer said a 4-4 tie was unlikely. “In short, this particular lawsuit seemed doomed, with the court’s biggest task figuring out how to say so without shutting the courthouse door entirely to such claims,” said longtime Supreme Court reporter Lyle Denniston.last_img read more

Having trouble concentrating? This brain network may be to blame

first_imgIn the modern world, replete with its smartphones, email, push notifications, and myriad other distractions, it can be tough to pay attention to the task at hand. Maintaining focus—especially on something boring—often seems to require an inordinate amount of brainpower. But where this ability comes from in the brain has remained enigmatic. Now, scientists have mapped out a network of brain regions whose connectedness may predict our ability to focus and even the likelihood that we have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).“I thought it was really fascinating work,” says University of Chicago in Illinois cognitive neuroscientist Ed Awh, who was not involved in the study. “It shows that this is something that is true in a general way in human brains.”Recent advances in a brain imaging technique known as functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, which measures blood flow in the brain in real time, have spurred a new type of neuroscience in which researchers monitor the entire brain at once to hunt for networks that activate during specific tasks. Although some brain regions contribute heavily to certain processes—like the occipital lobe in vision—much of this research shows that nearly everything we do requires many different interconnected parts, or nodes, in the brain.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The new study, published today in Nature Neuroscience, indicates that just such a network is used in maintaining concentration. After putting 25 adults in an fMRI machine, scientists asked them to complete a “gradual-onset continuous performance task” in which they were shown black and white pictures of either mountains or a city. Participants were instructed to press a button only when they saw a city scene, which accounted for about 90% of the images.“It’s a really super boring task, kind of by design,” says Yale University cognitive neuroscientist Monica Rosenberg, the study’s lead author. As easy as it might seem to differentiate mountains from cities, maintaining good performance on the test required that subjects pay close attention and not allow their minds to wander.After the trials were completed, a computer searched through the data set for patterns of connectivity in the brain—looking for connections that predicted a higher score on the attention test. This type of approach is incredibly powerful, but also prone to finding relationships where there are none. “When you do data driven analysis, by definition, you’re always going to find something,” says New York University in New York City child psychiatrist F. Xavier Castellanos, who was not involved in the study. “Even in random data, it’s going to find 5% of the relationships are significant.”To ensure that they were indeed seeing evidence of a “sustained attention network” used for concentration, one participant in each trial run was not given the continuous performance task. Instead, the left-out individual’s brain was mapped at rest in the fMRI, while the team looked at the strength of network connections. The computer then predicted that person’s ability to maintain focus based on how their network compared with the other 24 brain scans and the paired test performances. “We trained models on 24 subjects to predict the remaining 25th subject’s performance. We iterated through this procedure so that every subject was left out once,” Rosenberg explains.  As the researchers hoped, they discovered that the strength of the connections in the network were predictive of how well a participant would score on the attention test. “We could predict how well you would hypothetically do if you were to perform the test, even if you were just resting,” Rosenberg says. If the fMRI showed high connectivity in the sustained attention network of a person at rest, chances are that person would do well on the attention test.  The researchers also had access to a shared database of fMRI scans from previous studies around the world. They found a sample of 113 children in Beijing who had been evaluated for symptoms of ADHD after their brains were scanned. Using these results, the team found that the amount of connectivity in the sustained attention network could even predict a child’s score on a standardized ADHD rating scale: Children with good connectivity were less likely to have ADHD and vice versa. This finding was especially exciting to the researchers because the data set came all the way from Peking University in Beijing, meaning their model appears generalizable across highly disparate populations and age ranges as well.The approach could offer insights into the underpinnings of ADHD, but the team’s success also helps validate the idea that whole-brain networks may underlie many neurological functions, like memory or learning.“The horse race is on to see if these things hold up,” Castellanos says. “If they do, it means we’re really truly beginning to decipher brain functioning. This is the beginning of decoding the Egyptian hieroglyphics, and that’s immensely exciting.”last_img read more

Viswanathan Anand vs Boris Gelfand: Nerves hold the key in closing stages of clash in World Chess

first_imgNerves more than past reputation could hold the key in the closing stages of the ongoing World Chess Championships at the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow.A lot of beliefs and predictions have already been thrown out of the window. The first was that Viswanathan Anand would outplay Boris Gelfand, the second that two 40-year-old players could not produce riveting chess, and finally, a break has been made from animus-driven World Championships matches.Anand and Vladimir Kramnik played a cordial final in 2008, but this current match between the Indian and Gelfand has shown healthy mutual respect and a lot of maturity. Both have played the game in the right spirit and also produced good chess.What’s more, Gelfand, the underdog at the start, has shown excellent preparation. Gelfand, seen as a possible successor to Garry Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov in the early 1990s before he lost his way, seems to have found second wind.Overall, it has been a good match and a pretty good advertisement for chess. But should the match go into the rapids and tiebreaker, it will again open the debate on the length of the match.Most Grandmasters believe that a 12-game match is just too short for a Classical World Championships. Neither player would take risk, for the margin of error is too small, if not non-existent. A loss means it becomes tough to fight back, which is why Gelfand’s 17- move defeat in the eighth game, after a win in the seventh, was surprising. But Gelfand showed no ill- effects of the blunder. He has simply moved on.advertisementFor those who feel Anand will be comfortable in rapids or blitz, one only needs to look at Gelfand’s attitude. He has shrugged aside talk of statistics. He brushed aside history of not having beaten Anand for 19 years before the seventh game. The drought ended in the most important match of his career.Peter Svidler, the six-time Russian champion, smiled and remarked: “These guys have given us hope. It shows that we can still achieve a lot and aspire for a World Championships.”Gelfand has thrown up novelties and even an innovation as early as the fifth move in the 10th game and that certainly is a very creditable achievement at this level. Whenever Anand has tried to surprise him, Gelfand has hit back.Both have had one win each. When Gelfand won, he gave Anand no chance. Anand, always great at defending, kept looking at ways to get away, just could not find one to do so. But when Gelfand lost, it was a miserable loss. “There’re two games to go. Each one will have a white after the rest day. It’s important to note that those two games are not immediately following one another. So, both will have an additional day to prepare,” Svidler remarked after the 10th game.Anand refused to get drawn into the talk on tie-breakers. “I’m just playing every day and seeing what turns up, deciding strategy according to the position on the board,” he said.last_img read more